2 New STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI Photos and Why It’s Exciting that STAR WARS is Becoming More Diverse

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Star Wars: The Last Jedi is the most exciting movie for me, and many others, this year. We get to find out what the heck Luke has been up to, check up on the bromance that is Poe and Finn, and even see if Kylo becomes less emo (I doubt it). In addition, to check-ups and follow-ups, we’ll get to meet new characters such as Vice Admiral Amilyn Holdo and Rose. Here’s what we know about each of these new characters so far.

Laura Dern as Vice Admiral Amilyn Holdo

Laura Dern as Vice Admiral Amilyn Holdo

Vice Admiral Amilyn Holdo will be played by Laura Dern (Jurassic Park), and has purple hair. Rose is the first major Asian female character in the Star Wars movies and is a rebel mechanic. She will be played by Kelly Marie Tran (CollegeHumor) and although we don’t know much else, Tran did tell Time, “John Boyega is very funny, and sometimes we could improvise[.] Is that answer diplomatic enough?” That’s what we know. We don’t know if they’re meant to be good, or chaotic, or lawful, or maybe double agents. Isn’t that best though?

I am excited to see Star Wars bring in more great characters, and even more excited that the cast is becoming more and more diverse. Tran talked to Time about her growing up:

When I was growing up, I didn’t see anyone like me in movies. And I wanted to be white for the longest time, because I thought that meant my story would be valid[.] When you’re a kid, you see images on TV and on billboards and in magazines–they all look the same, and you wonder, ‘Why don’t I look like that? And can I change myself to look like that?’

I hope new generations can watch movies like this and not feel like they need to change to meet what is portrayed. I hope that the new characters add to the story and create new role models and favorites for kids and adults alike. What roles do you think these women will play in The Last Jedi?

Star Wars: The Last Jedi hits theaters December 15, 2017.

BATMAN FOREVER Gets the Honest Trailer Treatment

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Batman Forever was an interesting film. I feel like it took almost a complete 180 compared to Tim Burton’s previous Batman films. After two dark, Burton-y Batman movies, Joel Schumacher definitely puts a different spin on the films. The Honest Trailer team over at Screen Junkies is not afraid to point out how ridiculous most of the movie is (why doesn’t Val Kilmer ever close his mouth?!) but maintains (as it should) that it’s still not as bad as Batman and Robin. As Screen Junkies commented:

Before Justice League comes out this week look back on the Batman movie that changed Batman…..Forever – It’s Batman Forever!

Video Breaks Down Why Superman Reversing Time Is A Terrible Idea

If you’ve ever wondered what it would take for Superman to affect the Earth’s rotation, you’re about to jump into a very long-winded answer. In case you didn’t know this before jumping in, it would be incredibly impossible, even for Superman. Even if he did do that, everyone on Earth would die. That’s the simple answer, but Kyle from Nerdist explains it all a lot better below, so check out his video. 

Check Out This Interview With The Woman Who Owns That Crazy Robot Bar In Japan

If you follow Japanese culture at all, chances are you’ve heard of Tokyo’s Robot Restaurant. The restaurant boasts a live show with some of the craziest visuals you’ll ever see and a bunch of humans and robots dancing around. 

Who would come up with an idea like this? Who would sit down one day and think, “I think this is commercially viable, and people would want to see this,”?

Enter Namie Osawa who used to work in the clothing industry until she got the idea for this and enlisted a bunch of her out of work dancing friends to make it happen. Learn more about her story below, and if you’ve ever been to Tokyo’s Robot Restaurant, let us know in the comments!

Netflix is Developing a Series That Explores What Would Happen if Christ Showed Up in the Modern Day World

Netflix is developing a new series called Messiah, which tells a story of Jesus Christ and what it would be like if he showed up in the modern day world. It’s certainly an interesting concept. It will explore how society would react to a person who mysteriously appears in the Middle East claiming to be the Messiah and savior of the world.

The 10-episode series is described as a “suspenseful drama exploring the lines among religion, faith and politics”, and this is the synopsis that was released:

Messiah will chronicle the modern world’s reaction to a man who first appears in the Middle East creating a groundswell of followers around him claiming he is the Messiah. Is he sent from God or is he a dangerous fraud bent on dismantling the world’s geopolitical order? In ten hour-long episodes, the story unfolds from multiple points of view, including a young CIA agent, an Israeli Shin Bet officer, a Latino preacher and his Texan daughter, a Palestinian refugee and the media, among others.

The series was created by Michael Petroni (The Chronicles of Narnia: the Voyage of the Dawn TreaderThe Book Thief) and some of the episodes will be directed by James McTeigue (Sense8V for Vendetta). 

Cindy Holland, Vice President, Original Content for Netflix had this to say in a statement:

Messiah promises to be a fascinating series for viewers of every faith, and a thrilling drama filled with multi-layered characters set on a global stage.

Petroni added:

Messiah will have every viewer asking the question ‘is he or isn’t he?’ How you answer that question may reveal more about you than it does about the show. Messiah challenges us to examine what we believe and why.”

The producers of the series Roma Downey and Mark Burnett say that the series “could change everything.”

Messiah is a series that will have the audience asking big questions. What if someone showed up in 2018 amid strange occurrences and was thought to be the Messiah? What would society do? How would the media cover him? Would millions simply quit work? Could governments collapse? It’s a series that could change everything.”

There’s no doubt this will be fascinating series to watch. I’m curious to see where they actually go with it. We’ll find out in 2019 when it’s released. 

Review: JUSTICE LEAGUE Was an Enjoyable Film and It Made Me Love Superman Again

The wait is finally over. Justice League is in theaters now and there’s no doubt that fans are going to flock to see it regardless of the mediocre reviews and terrible Rotten Tomatoes score. There’s been a lot of talk about this film. Lots of fans are expecting it to be another crap DC film and a lot of fans are coming to its defense. 

Well, I attended a late screening of the movie last night and you know what? I actually enjoyed the film! Sure, it wasn’t without its problems, but for the most part, it was a fun action-packed movie with heart. I would say it’s better than Batman v Superman but not as good as Wonder Woman. In the end, it was a step in the right direction, and I think fans are going to like it.

The two biggest problems that I had with the film were the villain Steppenwolf and the VFX work that was done. Steppenwolf’s character was not established very well and I didn’t really find him to be that menacing. He came off as being a very one-dimensional character that would be an easy villain for the Justice League team to take out. And you know what? It seemed like an easy fight for them.

Then, I don’t know what was going on with the film’s special effects, but it was pretty cheap looking. Not sure why they skimped out on the VFX work, especially with the changing landscape during the climax of the film. One of the most glaring issues for me was Henry Cavill‘s CG upper lip. As you know, he had to reshoot several parts of the film with a mustache that would later be digitally removed. Well, that digital removal stuck out like a sore thumb! 

The story the movie told was ok. Batman and Wonder Woman set out on a mission to recruit Aquaman, The Flash, and Cyborg to help defeat Steppenwolf, who is collecting the Mother Boxes to destroy the world. There were a few holes in the plot along with some silly overlooked things that happen. I don’t want to spoil anything, so I won’t really get into specifics. But, there is one scene that leaves the team in a dire situation, then it cuts to them being out of it, and the audience is left wondering how they got out of the predicament. Then there’s another scene in which they basically end up giving one of the Mother Boxes to Steppenwolf. 

Now that my issues with the film are out of the way, I loved how the characters were handled in the movie! Aquaman, The Flash, Batman, Wonder Woman, they were all were wonderfully entertaining to watch. Jason Momoa was badass as Aquaman, Ezra Miller was amusingly loveable as The Flash, Ben Affleck lightened up a bit as Batman, Gal Gadot was as charming as ever as Wonder Woman, and Henry Cavill gave us the Superman I’ve been waiting for!

Justice League made me love Superman again! I wasn’t a big fan of how dark and moody he was in Man of Steel and Batman v Superman. But here, he was full of light hope and smiles. Regardless of the bad CG on the upper-lip, I loved Superman in this movie! He made me happy as a fan and it got me excited to see what Man of Steel 2 could end up being. 

As for Zack Snyder and Joss Whedon both having a hand in the film’s direction, everything seemed to come together nicely. I didn’t really see two different styles of filmmaking when watchng the film. However, you definitely notice both of their strengths in the film with Snyder’s visuals and Whedon’s character development. 

If you enjoy watching big spectacle comic book movies, you’re going to enjoy this for what it is. If you go into it looking for all of the bad aspects of the film, you’ll definitely find them. But, if you go just looking for an enjoyable good time at the movies, you’ll find it with Justice League

George Clooney Set to Star in and Direct The WWII Series CATCH-22

George Clooney has jumped on board to star in and direct a new World War II project called Catch-22, which will be an adaptation of 1961 Joseph Heller novel. It will be a six-episode limited series and it’s sure to make for a great and fascinating series. For those of you not familiar with the what the story deals with, here’s a description:

Catch-22 is set in Italy during World War II. It focuses on Capt. John Yossarian, a US Air Force bombardier who is furious because the bureaucratic rule known as  Catch-22, which specifies that a concern for one’s own safety in the face of dangers which are real and immediate is the process of a rational mind; a man is considered insane if he willingly continues to fly dangerous combat missions, but a request to be removed from duty is evidence of sanity and therefore makes him ineligible to be relieved from duty.

This is such an interesting story, which is why I’m excited about the series. I think this is the perfect project for Clooney to take on. According to Variety, Clooney will take on the role of Colonel Cathcart. Here’s a little background on the character:

He is a group commander at a U.S. Army Air Corps base in Pianosa and is obsessed with becoming a general. As such, he does whatever it takes to please his superiors—in particular, by repeatedly raising the number of missions the men have to fly to complete a tour of duty, beyond that normally ordered by other outfits. This becomes the bane of Yossarian’s life, as every time he comes close to obtaining the target number of missions for being sent home, Colonel Cathcart raises the required number again. Ironically, Cathcart himself has only flown in two missions, one of which was accidental.

Catch-22 was previously adapted into a film in 1970 with Alan Arkin in the role of Yossarian and Martin Balsam in the role of Cathcart. The series will reportedly start shooting in 2018 and Clooney’s producing partner Grant Heslov will also direct a portion of the series.

Catch-22 will be the first regular TV role that Clooney has had since he starred in the 1990s series E.R.

Witness Tesla’s New Car Going From 0-60 In 2 Seconds

It’s one thing to hear that Tesla’s new Roadster can go from 0-60 in 2 seconds, but experiencing it is a new thing entirely. Now, unless you have a $50k deposit to put down, you won’t be getting a test ride in one anytime soon, but you can witness the speed in this video! At around 56:20 in the video you’ll see this baby in action, and it literally looks like a plane took off down the runway!

Watch some rich dude flip out, and let us know if you think Tesla just showed us the future of driving. 

Josh Gad, Daisy Ridley, and Luke Evans Team Up For a Netflix Superhero Project Called SUPER-NORMAL

Josh Gad has a new superhero project that he’s been shopping around Hollywood called Super-Normal and it just landed at Netflix. He will star in the project alongside Daisy Ridley and Luke Evans. He previously worked with both actors on Murder on the Orient Express and Beauty and the Beast. They make for a pretty radical cast!

The movie is being written by brothers Aaron and Jordan Kandell, who previously worked on Disney’s Moana. There are no plot details, but THR says, “Super-Normal is intended to be a character-driven, subversive take on a genre that Hollywood and the rest of the world loves too much.”

With Gad being the brains behind the series, there’s no doubt this will end up being a fun comedic twist on the superhero genre. 

Jay Talks to Perks of Being a Wallflower Director Stephen Chbosky and Author R.J. Palacio About Their New Film Wonder

by: Jay Carlson – Editor-in-Chief

Based on the New York Times bestseller, WONDER tells the inspiring and heartwarming story of August Pullman.  Born with facial differences that, up until now, have prevented him from going to a mainstream school, Auggie becomes the most unlikely of heroes when he enters the local fifth grade.  As his family, his new classmates, and the larger community all struggle to find their compassion and acceptance, Auggie’s extraordinary journey will unite them all and prove you can’t blend in when you were born to stand out.

I recently had the opportunity to sit down and discuss Wonder with Screenwriter/Director Stephen Chbosky as well as the writer of the beloved source novel, R. J. Palacio, who also served as an executive producer on the film. Chbosky is no stranger adapting novels for the big screen, his last film was the well-received adaptation of his own coming of age novel, The Perks of Being a Wallflower back in 2012. With Wonder he tackles another coming of age story, but one that is no less impactful than Perks.

The following interview has been edited for content and clarity.

As a writer you always worry about what someone will do when they adapt your work for another medium. Knowing that Stephen is a writer, did that ease any concerns going into this?

R.J. Palacio: It did, it really did. We had met for a really wonderful three-hour dinner before we started with the movie and it was really evident to me that Stephen, as an author, his intention was to be as faithful to the book as possible. And where he wasn’t able to be completely faithful to the book, he was faithful to the intent and spirit of the book. So, I had complete faith.

Where did the idea for Wonder come from?

RJP: I was inspired by, in fact in the book there’s a scene where Jack Will talks about the very first time he sees Auggie in his neighborhood, and that scene was based on a real life encounter that I had when I was with my two sons where we found ourselves in very close proximity to a girl who had a very severe cranial facial difference and my son reacted and I kind of… That just inspired me to think about what it must be like to face a world everyday that really doesn’t know how to face you back. To face a world that stares at you, that points at you, when you feel absolutely ordinary on the inside, but no one else sees you that way.

Stephen, what made you want to direct a film based on this story?

Stephen Chbosky: What inspired me was that I love the book. It was given to me right around the time my son Theodore was born. There was something about the timing of reading this beautiful story about a boy and his parents and his older sister. And here I had an older daughter and a new son. The symmetry, it really spoke to me and seeing all the struggles that the Pullman family went through. I felt like I related to what my own memory of being a child, for Auggie, but then his parents. So all the different points of view in the book, which I love, it really got me in the heart. Not only that, but I also recognized the quality of the book. I really think this is one of the most important books written in the last several decades. I love it. I think that it’s so artful, especially for this age range, and I was honored to be part of it.

How did you approach creating a story that appeals to both children and adults?

RJP: I’ve always thought a good story, is a good story. I think one of the worst things a writer can do is write down to a certain age group. And certainly I tried never to do that with Wonder. The only thing I did in terms of keeping my target audience in mind, was to write with shorter sentences, which I might usually express myself as a writer with. I get the way that kids read. Keep the sentences a little short, keep the chapters a little short. Otherwise, a good story is about propelling the narrative forward and keeping kids or adults excited about turning the page. That’s all I tried to do.

SC: It was easier for me, because I loved the book so much to just focus on the characters. My approach was, regardless of how you get into the story, whether you’re a parent or a kid or close to one age or the other, or you’re an educator, whatever it is, there would be some way in. I was just hoping that everyone would find the same exit. However it got you, that you could share this story about kindness or about empathy, or you could just enjoy a good laugh or a good cry, or optimism or hope. As R.J. said, a good story is a good story. I was really excited… I think we all go into the movie thinking, “Oh we’re going to see Auggie’s first day of school,” right? I was really proud that we had enough bandwidth to tell mom’s first day of school story. Just in that one little shot, that’s all you need, alone in the house. I’m really excited as a parent to know that there’s going to be millions of children who will see that and for one brief moment think, “Huh, what’s my mom do while I’m at school?” That’s really exciting. There’s something about just shining a really simple light on a simple truth and then let the audience make their own conclusions. That’s exciting every time.

How collaborative did you make the process of adapting the book? R.J. mentioned there were changes, was she a part of that process?

SC: One hundred percent. R.J. was more than an author to me. She was my secret weapon in everything. Being a fellow author, I know what I brought to Perks of Being a Wallflower as a filmmaker, but as an author I knew how valuable knowing all… I never got, for example when I was making Perks, no actor ever said to me, “My character would never say that.” It doesn’t exist because I create the whole world, so now I’m adapting it. R.J. was an invaluable resource and I honestly think she’s a brilliant writer. So, if I was stuck on a scene, or I was working on the screenplay, I would always ask her, “Hey, do you have a version of this scene?” I want to read it. I might only take one line from it, but that one line was all the difference. I’ll give you an exact example of her and my collaboration at work, Summer and Auggie are sitting at that table and she offers her hand and R.J. wrote the line, that “You’ll get the plague.” I never thought to put it in there and I love that line so much that I took it and I gave Summer the line, “Good.” That was it. It was a perfect marriage. But there were so many others. We talked about casting, we talked about cuts, we talked about everything. Because ultimately I knew that I would never make a successful version of the Wonder movie without her approval, her input and ultimately her blessing.

RJ: And there were moments when Stephen or the producers would ask my opinion and ultimately decided to go a different way. And that was fine because I always felt like I, and I said to them, that I don’t need to be the final voice in the room, I just want to be one of the voices. Just so you hear my opinion on something and it should have no more importance or weight than someone else’s voice. They were really good at respecting that and it was really a lot of fun for me. I would get call from Stephen out in California about little things. Like, “So what color sofa do you think the Pullman’s would have?”

SC: It’s important stuff.

RJP: Or, “What kind of laptop sleeve would Isabel have?” Or, “What would she be writing her dissertation about?” It was great for me because these were my characters that I got to then think, “Huh what would her dissertation be?” It was actually a fun way of extending the Wonder writing process.

You’ve now adapted your own novel as well as someone else’s. Which is easier for you?

SC: It’s pros and cons for each. I find the process of collaborating with another author a lot more fun because not all the pressure is on me. It’s slightly nerve-wracking sometimes because I don’t have all the answers. You know? If someone says was, “What would Isabel’s dissertation be about,” God, I don’t know. It’s terrible that I don’t know this. Luckily we had a great relationship. Out of all our disagreements, there’s only one we had that I thought could be dismissed, which was, “Don’t use Springsteen.” Shame. (Laughter) That’s it. Otherwise…

RJP: Whooa. It was the Christmas song. I love Springsteen.

SC: It was Santa Claus is Coming to Town. “I don’t know about that song, Stephen.” Well, I do and I like it.

If you get the rights for Springsteen you use it.

SC: Thank you, thank you.

RJP: Just not that song.

SC: New York Christmas, hmm…. East coast Christmas. Uhhh… Name another song, you can’t. Thank you, case closed.

In the book, Auggie’s facial difference isn’t explicitly described. How did it go from what you had in mind to the actual prosthetics?

SC: We got very fortunate, Arjen Tuiten, our makeup designer is a very brilliant guy. He did some work on Pan’s Labyrinth, he did some work on Maleficent and a bunch of other things. He’s trained by Rick Baker and is a brilliant guy. Part of being a director is being a pragmatist. Whatever I can imagine as a reader in this case, not an author, as a reader. There’s only so much as a nine-year-old actor can go through. There’s only so much you can do to a face. My guiding principal was I want the make-up to be real. I want the performance to be his. Sure, you could animate the face if you want to, but I knew it wouldn’t be as powerful. So we took the make-up to as extreme a place as we could go practically. Then we used CGI to clean up certain little things. That was it. I knew for the audience to respond to Auggie that it would have to be Jacob’s real eyes, his real voice, his real mouth and everything past that would feel fake.

RJP: In every single book that you love when you see it translated to a movie, there’s always that moment of, “That’s not exactly how I pictured the vampire Lestat looking.”

SC: Wow. Deep cut. (Laughter) Tom Cruise is passing on your next one.

RJP: Then you see it and they made it their own, but it’s different than what you imagined. And that happens anytime any book is turned into a movie. In wonder It’s especially important because really it’s all about the face. On the other hand, in the book, one of the reasons I didn’t go into too much detail… I described it a little bit, but one of the reasons was because it didn’t matter what he looked like, it’s just that he looked different. The movie gets that. Regardless of whether he’s an extreme version of a kid with a cranial facial difference or a moderate version, there’s lots of distinctions on the spectrum, the fact is that he looks different than other kids in the fifth grade. Any difference is enough, especially at that age, to make you the target, the easy target of the meaner kids in the class.

Did Stephen create what you had in your head?

RJP: My vision of Auggie was probably different.

SC: Yours was more extreme.

RJP: Yeah, mine was more extreme. But I was really happy when I saw it. Now it’s tough for me to see Auggie in my mind and not see Jacob.

Stephen, is it scary to hang the success of your film on a ten-year-old under heavy prosthetics?

SC: Well, he was nine. (Laughter) No. It’s not, because first of all, without Arjen… I was shown some other things early in the process that looked terrible. Not Arjen’s stuff. But before that there were other people did bids and I realized that it just wasn’t going to work at all. Once I saw his sculpt, he has this amazing contraption, a helmet and it attaches with glue to his eyes and you could click it and you can literally move his face around. Once he showed me how it could be done I had every confidence in the world. And Jacob is so good, he’s just such a once in a generation talent that I had no reservations. I really didn’t.

What is something that you think the book does to add to the experience and vice versa?

RJP: Two things. I’d say one is that the movie actually tells a couple stories that aren’t told in Wonder. We see more of the parents in the film. In Wonder (the book) we only see the parents from the kids point of view. So we only know what their lives are through the filter of their kids. So, they’re central to the story but they’re somewhat in the background. Whereas here we see them without the kids. We kind of get to know them a little bit better and Stephen wrote scenes that filled in those narratives on their own. So they are a little bit more complex (in the film).

The second thing is, what I think they did justice to in the movie… The book I’ve often described as being a meditation on kindness, because really the theme of the book is all about the importance of the impact of kindness. I would say on that note they really, really beautifully echoed that from the book. In their own way, they enhanced it. You leave the movie feeling good, really good. Certainly living in the times we are now, that’s really great. That’s a nice thing.

SC: My hope is that the movie will lead everybody back to the book. The book has two more points of view, Justin and Summer and they are both incredible. There was only so much room that we had, so I chose four (points of view) instead of six. And there are supplemental books and other things (that R.J.) has written. If you really want to do a deep dive it’s worth your time.

One of the great parts of the story is the struggle of the other family members and how their lives are impacted both positively and less positively by a kid like Auggie. I don’t think most people probably ever think about that.

RJP: A lot of the sweetest emails I’ve gotten have been from the parents of children with any kind of difference, who after reading the book they were reminded about their other children and the impact of having a kid with any kind of special needs… how that impacts all of the other kids and to remember that sometimes they just don’t have time. They’re going through so much with this one kid that the other kid’s kind of become self-sufficient and they have to remember that, no they’re not. They’re still our kids and they need us. That’s been really nice.

SC: The multiple points of view is one of the things I love most about the book. I thought it set it far and above any other book even around the subject. So I wanted to preserve that for the movie.

Wonder does it did really well, compared to a lot of other family films by showing the perspectives of all the other characters whenever possible.

SC: Yeah. I thought, how do you do tell a story about kindness or empathy without stopping and saying, this is what mom’s going through, this is what Via is going through. It leads to some really great things artistically and I loved doing it.

It reminds me too; (To R.J.) you were saying before about the emails that you get…  Something we haven’t talked about is… we had a lot of kids who had this condition visit us on set. It was very important to the actors on set and to me and the whole community of filmmakers. It’s very interesting because something I learned about kids and tried to give it to the movie is, if you have a kid with a cranial facial difference, everybody around them like their parents, wants to talk about that condition. Everybody wants to talk about that condition more than the kid. The kid wants to talk about baseball and Star Wars. That was a fascinating thing to watch, and I tried to, as much as I could with the different performances and the different points of view to remind us all the time that we are not our conditions, we are ourselves. That was something in the point of view that the process lead to that was very exciting.

R.J.,How do you feel about your book being used in classrooms?

RJP: You can’t foresee any of this. Certainly when you’re writing a book you’re hoping it gets published. Then if it gets published, you’re hoping one or two people will read it and that’s as far as I would go. So everything that’s happened afterwards has been, whether it’s the movie or the idea that it’s been adopted in so many classrooms across the country… and in Germany and the UK… and Ireland, I just found out has a whole curriculum in year six of the whole country is using Wonder as a year six sort of mandatory reading. That really threw me because I am a huge fan of Irish writers and if they like my book then I’m like, Woooow. No one writes like the Irish

SC: In sixth grade they give every kid a copy of Wonder?

RJP: Yeah.

SC: And a Guinness.

(Laughter)

RJP: Just the idea that it’s kind of a rite of passage at a certain point, just like To Kill a Mockingbird is kind of a rite of passage for seventh grade in most of the country and the idea that Wonder might someday be that kind of, you’ve reached fifth grade or sixth grade and it’s sort of a schoolwide read… That’s kind of cool, knowing that long after I’m gone from this earth that this might still be the case.

SC: I think that there are very good chances.

RJP: I don’t know, but it’s nice to that if that’s what I become known for for the rest of my life… that’s not a bad thing.

SC: She gave you the very, very polite, very self-deprecating author answer. Here, I’ll give you the fan answer, which is yes the book is that good, yes it’s being taught in schools, deservedly so. Once I came on board to the movie and people asked me about it, I said to everybody: I believe for middle grade there are three books in American literature that are taught in school… There is To Kill a Mockingbird, there’s The Outsiders and there is Wonder. I think that’s the list, personally. I would even put it above The Outsiders, but that’s just me.

With things like Stranger Things and IT, kid focused stories seem to be back. Do you see yourself doing more kids films?

SC: Yeah. I do. Absolutely I do.

RJP: He’s so good with kids.

SC: I just finished my second novel on Friday. It revolves, not a hundred percent, but there’s definitely a kid element to that one as well. I love it. I love their enthusiasm, they’re SO excited to go to work.

RJP: And you speak kid.

SC: I’m very immature.

RJP: You should have seen him on set with the little kids. They just loved him. The way he would talk to them. He speaks kid. They loved him.

They say you should never work with kids or animals and you do both here.

SC: And make-up. I got all three.

RPJ: The dog was a little tough, right?

SC: Yeah, dogs, make-up and kids. it was all quite an experience, but I loved it. I have a philosophy with casting, I don’t just cast actors, I cast human beings. These kids were so nice and so grateful and enthusiastic to be there that it just made us all better.

The two child leads are very, very good.

RJP: They really are.

SC: Yeah and I remember saying to the casting folks, Deb and Tricia and Jen that I want the best kid cast since Stand by Me. That was my bar. I thought, whether we get there or not, lets aim for it. It’s always fun to aim really high. And I thought, man, did they deliver. it was amazing.

Julia Roberts and Owen Wilson had surprising chemistry, as well as the kids.

SC: A lot of that was, we had a read through of the family, we had a read through of the kids and that was it. Rehearsal was to go bowling. You know? Go have a pizza party. If you just catch kids being kids… Like the fireworks. I didn’t direct that. Kids know how to be in school, they sit there, they know how to pass notes and they know how to do those kinds of things. A lot of it was just trying to capture the spontaneity and let everybody, all the actors especially know, they literally could not make a mistake. My only rule was, know your lines. If you know your lines, then everything else will be free and fun. And it was. And that’s really important. To make it feel like summer camp, not like a job.

Was there anything that you shot and loved but ultimately decided that it didn’t fit with the rest of the film and you had to cut it? Or was there anything you wished you’d been able to shoot?

RJP: Maybe small details here and there that I can’t even think of now, but at the time might have seemed important. Stephen would always tell me, when I’d bring up those little details, “What about this line? I really liked that line” And he would say, ” I tried, it’s not fitting. Just trust me, just trust me.” It wasn’t until I actually saw the movie from beginning to end that I realized that he was absolutely right. In terms of telling a story, in terms of pacing the story, in terms of all these filmmaking things that of course I had never been part of a movie, I’d never seen a movie being filmed, so I didn’t have any context with which to judge, Stephen was right. Like, oh that’s why he made that scene more important, even though it’s not that important in the book. In the movie there is a certain pace to the narrative and the story unfolds in a cinematic way. Differently that it does in a book. And that’s a necessity of a translation of mediums and he knew that. I had to see it to get it.

SC: One of the things, it took me a couple of movies to realize this… to use a music analogy, a song is not all chorus. It’s really hard for something, like this story that’s so powerful, so emotional, restraint is the way that you have it. You don’t have an emotional film by indulging in the emotion. You have an emotional film by fighting the emotion. So sometimes I’d have to make decisions… Here’s a good example. There’s a beautiful scene in the book, one of my favorite chapters in the book actually, which is about Daisy. After Daisy dies there’s a beautiful scene in the book where Auggie talks to his mom about, will Daisy recognize me in heaven? It’s incredible. I filmed it. But it was just too much. We just went through this experience; the audience has to breath. So I changed it. I still wanted a parent moment so I changed it to Auggie walking up and comforts his father. Which, in the book is so beautiful, where he witnesses his father cry, which was so moving. Then I thought, I’ve seen that before, I’ve never seen the child… I’d never seen the baton being passed. I’m going to comfort you this time, dad. So that’s what I did.

Did you have any particular favorite scene?

SC: My favorite scene in the film is a very easy one for me to answer. The flashback to Via’s fourth birthday. Because that’s my daughter. I was in Vancouver filming, I missed her actual, honest to god, fourth birthday. It just so happens that she looks a lot like Izabela Vidocic, who played Via. And it also happens that there is a flashback that she talks about wishing for a brother. And I thought, oh wouldn’t that be great? I needed one little flashback to get to the end of the beautiful monologue in Our Town. In terms of the book? I couldn’t even pick. There’s so many great moments, so many surprising and unexpected moments, I couldn’t love it more. Yeah, it’s amazing.

What’s next?

RJP: I am working on a couple of books. One is a graphic novel and the other is a novel I’ve been working on that’s not Wonder related, which I put on hold to work on this graphic novel which is somewhat Wonder related. Tangential. It’s like my other stories, they’re not sequels, but they kind of live in the Wonder universe. They’re either characters that are mentioned in the book or whatever. This actually is a story that takes place during World War II, it’s the story of Julian’s grandmother.

SC: As I said, I just finished my second novel, (the first) in two decades Friday. So we’ll wait to see what my agents think.

Can you tell us anything about it?

SC: I can tell you this… It’s my tribute to my favorite American writer, Stephen King. I love his work and I’ve always wanted to tell a very epic, emotional horror story. And that’s what I did.

 

Wonder is open nationwide Friday 11/17/17. It really is a wonderful film to share with the whole family, with a lovely message. Take a look at the trailer below: